Don’t vaccinate? You’re an idiot

Published January 1, 2007 in Writing

Turns out the doctor who tried to scare people by claiming a link between the MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) vaccine and autism was paid by people who wanted to create a scare and sue vaccine makers. From the Times of London: ANDREW WAKEFIELD, the former surgeon whose campaign linking the MMR vaccine with autism caused […]

Turns out the doctor who tried to scare people by claiming a link between the MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) vaccine and autism was paid by people who wanted to create a scare and sue vaccine makers.

From the Times of London:

ANDREW WAKEFIELD, the former surgeon whose campaign linking the MMR vaccine with autism caused a collapse in immunisation rates, was paid more than £400,000 by lawyers trying to prove that the vaccine was unsafe.

The payments, unearthed by The Sunday Times, were part of £3.4m distributed from the legal aid fund to doctors and scientists who had been recruited to support a now failed lawsuit against vaccine manufacturers.

Critics this weekend voiced amazement at the sums, which they said created a clear conflict of interest and were the “financial engine” behind a worldwide alarm over the triple measles, mumps and rubella shot.



  1. gnomic says:

    I strongly encourage all of you who don’t like vaccines not to have them. Or any other medical treatment – they might cause something too. You just can’t be too careful. Did you know that keyboards and CRTs generate electric fields that some believe cause cancer? Its absolutely true. Google it. Right now this blog is causing you to have cancer. ITS KILLING YOU. You should come back when the computer technician will sign a 17 page form guaranteeing that you won’t ever be harmed by anything related to computers for the rest of you life.

  2. gnomic says:

    Wow, Andrew, this blog line is like a light to moths. Very, very stupid moths. Moths that have no idea how to make an informed risk decision, or understand the difference between causation, correlation, and just plain stupid nonsense.

    You should spin this off and charge for it. Separating fools from their money is your patriotic duty.

  3. Neerock99 says:

    It is true that vaccinating has a low percent of having a side effect,not vaccinating your children does not automatically mean they are going to the measles, mumps, or rubella. I have never been vaccinated, am twenty years old. I have never seriously sick. Never had the flu or any other other serious disease. Fear is a great way to control the masses.

  4. Robert says:

    I didn’t get the swine-flu vac and neither did my kids. I felt gultiy at the time, but I’m glad I followed my instincts. Your six words made me tear up. (that happens a lot, in case you hadn’t caught on)Mine, because this has been a recurring theme as of late, “Have learned to follow my instincts.”

  5. Icca says:

    I happen to biveele that vaccines are important to keeping not only our own kids safe but also kids within this country safe. While I’m not personally telling anyone what to decide as far as their own child is concerned, if every parent decided not to vaccinate their child, then these diseases would come back in droves and people would get very sick and die. The reason these vaccines exist and are still given to people is because the diseases still exist.I know the MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) vaccine is hotly debated as a cause for autism. For a long time it was biveeled that the mercury used as a preservative in the immunization was the cause. Well, mercury hasn’t been used in vaccines for many years now and autism does not only still exist, it’s incidence rate is increasing. Also, there has been ANOTHER big study recently published that I biveele Isabella may have given a link for, which shows that there is no link between the MMR shot and autism. Still, if parents want to vaccinate their kids but feel that the recommended schedule is too clumped together or too rigorous, then an adapted vaccine schedule can be used. It’s just an option.I used to work in a room with 8 autistic adults, and the parents for each of those adults had a different period in their child’s life when they became autistic . Even between those 8 people, there was NO obvious identifying thing that caused their autism. They all had varying degrees of autism as well.I happen to personally biveele that autism is caused by a genetic predisposition triggered by some environmental trigger. I don’t know what that trigger is, but if you study families that have autistic kids, you tend to see family members possessing some of the singular characteristics of autism. For instance, you may have the antisocial uncle, etc.This is a hot debate and more and more people are being directly affected by this disease and its effects. Instead of thinking that any one of us has all the answers, maybe our energy is best spent by supporting the people who are getting out there to put the word out (no matter what their personal opinion is), AND, the people who are researching and trying to find not only the cause for cures for this very baffling disease. If no one has seen the new movie Temple (about the PhD professor at Colorado State University Temple Grandin, who has autism), it’s fascinating.

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